Monday, November 07, 2005

GPRS with ibook and nokia 6600

Its been a while since I've setup my ibook to use the GPRS connection. It has come in really handy before in the sunshine coast hinterland town of malany where there weren't any telephones in the luxury chalets and to get to the nearest phone line, would mean a trek to the hut at the entrance where one phone might be available.

I believe anyone who owns a mobile and bluetooth capable notebook should at least set up their GPRS to the notebook. Its good to know that in cases of emergency, when there isn't any power and the lines are cut, you can at least check your mail or surf the net at slow speeds. In my case, one of things I must have is SSH. SSH actually works fine on GPRS. Its a bit laggy, but usable. This means youre never too far from your server.

Each GPRS connection for mobile providers are different. The differences are in the APN. I've included some in this post.

There are 3 steps to this process:


Step 1: Add/Pair your mobile as a device your computer can recognise. This shouldn't be too difficult with bluetooth assistant.


Step 2: Download your modem scripts/driver files. I've lost the links I've managed to download the Nokia modem scripts from, but I'm still glad I have the files. I'm using the "Nokia GPRS CID 1" script. Just download and copy these files to /Library/Modem Scripts. After you copy the files there, you can specify which file to use in system preferences.

System Preferences > Network > Bluetooth > Bluetooth Modem > Nokia GPRS CID 1


Step 3: Setup your network connection. Remember to add the DNS servers in the TCP/IP Tab. No comma required for DNS, just put each ip on a new line.

For APN

System Preferences > Network > Bluetooth > PPP > Account Name:

Leave everything else blank. It does look weird, but you have to remember that your mobile is already authenticated to its GPRS connection.

Caution: I see a posibility for hackers to search nearby mobile and try to use their GPRS connection for net access. Bluetooth security does require a pin to pair, so thats one barrier, but if a hacker pairs your mobile when youre not looking, you can be a potential victim. So that means if your mobile device beeps and says accept connection from blah. Say no and look at your pairing to make sure nothing extra is there. Its still good practice if this hack sounds a little far fetched.


Operator: - Optus
GPRS APN: - internet
Username: - {blank}
Password: - {blank}
DNS: - 202.139.83.3, 192.65.91.129

Operator: - Telstra
GPRS APN: - telstra.internet
Username: - {blank}
Password: - {blank}
DNS: - 139.130.4.4, 203.50.170.2

Operator: - M1
GPRS APN: - mobilenet
Username: - {blank}
Password: - {blank}
DNS: - 202.79.64.21, 202.79.64.26

Operator: - SingTel
GPRS APN: - internet
Username: - {blank}
Password: - {blank}
DNS: - 165.21.100.88, 165.21.83.88

Operator: - Starhub
GPRS APN: - shwapint
Username: - {blank}
Password: - {blank}
DNS: - 203.116.1.78, 203.116.254.150

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